Home Insurance Companies to Insure Your Straw Bale Building

Finding a home insurance company willing to insure your straw bale home may be difficult or may indeed be impossible. This is not because they are not worthy of insurance but because many insurance underwriters are operating from a place of fear and ignorance. Many underwriters I have heard from have said they could not write a policy because of the risk of fire yet all of the evidence points to the FACT that SB homes are far more resistant to fire than conventional homes. Below is a link that will take you to a list of insurance companies that you may want to contact including State Farm, Farmers, Allstate, and Farm Bureau among others.

Click on the following link (http://sbregistry.greenbuilder.com/insurance.straw) to see a list of companies that can, will, and currently do provide insurance for bale homes. If you click deeper in the website, you may even find the name of an agent in your area who can help you. If all else fails, you can tell the insurance companies that you are building a post and beam home (as long as you are not building load bearing). After all, when was the last time you heard a conventional builder or home owner tell the insurance company that they were building a fiberglass insulation home? The bales are insulation, nothing more, so don’t tell the insurance company more than they need to know. Having said that, I want to promote the use of straw bales and so I always encourage owners to try and insure the home as a SB home first and only resort to the “less information module” when forced to do so. The more the insurance companies here about straw bale, the sooner they will have to stand up and notice the growing industry.

6 Responses to Home Insurance Companies to Insure Your Straw Bale Building

  1. lilkixhon Sun, February 15, 2009 at 1:25 am #

    Hello.
    I’m new there
    Nice forum!

  2. M. Phillips Tue, August 11, 2009 at 8:06 am #

    Please do NOT believe or do what the above article states. If you are not upfront with your insurance company re the type of house you are building,when you have a claim, the claim will be DENIED. You have just paid all those premium $$$$ for nothing. The coverage will be null and void. Best to be upfront. However, best of luck in finding a company to insure this type of structure.

  3. Andrew Tue, August 11, 2009 at 9:02 am #

    Insurance companies will do whatever it takes to deny coverage. We all know that. It’s one of the most crooked industries around. My two cents.

    That said, you’re not telling them anything other than the truth. If you tell them you’re building a post and beam home or a post and beam home with cellulose insulation, that is 100% the truth. Like I said, when are you required to tell the insurance company that you are building a fiberglass insualtion home? Never. You may be asked to list the insulation material, maybe, but it won’t make or break the insurance coverage.

    If asked about the insulation, write in cellulose material. If they want more information, tell them straw bales. I am not recommending that you lie. I am recommending that you give them onlywhat they ask for and nothing more. Is there an exclusion on your policy against straw bale walls or some other language that will render your policy useless when called upon? If not, then they have no ground to stand on for pulling coverage if you’re honest in your application. Writing cellulose is an honest statement (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cellulose).

    The problem here is that the industry won’t recognize the FACT that straw bale construction has been independently tested for fire ratings and that is exceeds that of conventional homes. If they would stop creating a misconception about the building material, it would be easier to say “I’m building with bales!!!”

  4. Ryan Wed, October 28, 2009 at 2:58 pm #

    The insurance company’s basis for denying coverage would most likely be due to the “unique” construction rather than the material itself. If the home does not “fit the mold” for their actuarial tables, then they would just be grasping at straws to determine the correct rate to charge. This is why the insurance industry is usually behind the curve when trying to offer coverage for unique structures–not because they are crooked.

  5. Ebony Troop Wed, February 10, 2010 at 9:18 am #

    Love it. I’m Facebooking this one to my friends.

  6. Irvin Sanges Wed, April 7, 2010 at 8:31 am #

    The protection offered by building and contents insurance, can cover a valuable home and all of its contents against a huge range of risks, but if you are one of the thousands of people struggling to afford the mortgage that comes with a new house your first home then there are various government initiatives to help, it is not hard to find them.

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