Andrew MorrisonWelcome to StrawBale.com

My name is Andrew Morrison and welcome to my straw bale building site dedicated to anyone interested in building their own straw bale house. If you are brand new to straw bale or are a straw bale construction specialist there's something for you at StrawBale.com.

Click here if you are NEW TO STRAW BALE BUILDING and want to know the basics about straw bale construction.

I have a ton of information for you including: photo gallery, step-by-step instructional videos, information about straw bale workshops around the world, free straw bale articles, free straw bale social network, and a full straw bale building blog.

Be sure to sign up for my e-mail updates and my free 16 day straw bale e-course so we can keep you posted of the latest developments in the ever-changing world of straw bale.

Happy Baling!
Andrew

p.s. If you are eager to fast track your education in straw bale construction, click here.

My Latest Blog Entries Are Below

Repairing Water Damaged Straw Bale Walls

Drying WallsRepairing water damage in straw bale walls is a skill that is not required very often, especially in well built homes; however, even with the best construction practices, water damage can happen. If it does, it’s important to know how to recognize it and how to fix it. Below is a series of steps to consider wen dealing with water damaged walls.

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Article In Green Builder Magazine Online

Green Builder MagHere’s a short article about straw bale construction in the most recent version of the on line Green Builder magazine. Short but sweet. The article starts on page 44 and can be viewed at this link.

For Sale 1.4 Acres With Active Building Permit for a Straw Bale House in Colorado

St. Vrain RiverFor those of you interested in purchasing land in Colorado and building a straw bale house, here’s an incredible property that has the ball already rolling towards your success. Check out the information below about this amazing piece of land. Here’s a quick summary: 1.4 acres; Active building permit & plans for 1200 square foot straw bale, passive solar house. The photo is at the St. Vrain trailhead, 1/4 mile from the land.

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Straw Bale Home is Cover of Fine Homebuilding

Fine HomebuildingFor those of you who have been wondering what it will take to help straw bale homes become more mainstream, this may be a part of the answer. David Arkin and Annie Tilt (Arkin-Tilt Architects) are well known for their beautiful and functional designs. They have received many awards over the years and their straw bale homes have at least twice graced the covers of Fine Homebuilding Magazine, this time in the fall 2014 edition of Small Homes Cabins and Cottages.

I have said for many years that we as a group of individuals, a community of straw bale fans, really need to focus on bringing straw bale construction into the light of everyday people. One way to do that is to start with inspiring design. As an example, when I would walk prospective clients through a home of mine, I would leave out the words “straw bale” and focus on the beauty, energy efficiency and overall design of the home. Once the prospective clients were drawn into those details, the words straw bale had much less scare factor to them.

Let’s keep building on this exposure that Arkin-Tilt Architects, and others with a similar passion for straw bale construction are sharing with the world. Getting the word out to the masses will take time and effort. Every time a beautiful straw bale home is shared with the world, that steep mountain we seem to be climbing gets a little smaller. Keep it positive. Keep it beautiful.

And of course, way to go David and Annie! Feel free to congratulate them yourselves…

Upcoming Workshops

Flathead Lake Straw BaleI just returned from Flathead Lake, Montana where a group of 35 people put together an incredibly beautiful straw bale home in 7 days. I continue to be amazed at how much fun these workshops are and at how incredibly quickly a random sampling of people become a community of friends and how those friends can work together to create something special.

This was the last workshop of the year for me and I am now focussing my efforts on finalizing the workshop schedule for 2015. We will be announcing next year’s schedule over Thanksgiving weekend, so stay tuned, and get excited!

By the way, if you are interested in hosting, I am still looking for one or two more locations for next year. Click here and fill out the application on line ASAP if you want to be considered as a host for 2015.

In the meantime, I want to share a couple opportunities to learn about straw bale construction with CASBA (the California Straw Building Association). They have two upcoming events that would be a good introduction to working with bales. They are listed below along with links to learn more about each event.

Fri September 19 2014 9:00 am – Sun September 21 2014 1:00 pm
Fri October 3 2014 9:00 am – Sun October 5 2014 1:00 pm

Brand New Plaster Sprayer For Sale

Plaster SprayerHi everyone. I have a brand new, never used plaster sprayer for sale. I bought it a while back but have not used it. I guess I don’t need two after all! If you are interested in buying it, let me know. It is a great little sprayer and the same kind I have used on many jobs in the past. It sells for $265.00 plus shipping. I’m hoping for something close since it is literally out of the box. I’m open to offers. :)

Plastering Overhead

Dining Room HutchThere is no question that plastered window wells look beautiful; however, the skill it takes to get them to that point may seem out of reach to a novice plasterer. The good news is, it’s not. With a little practice and a good serving of patience, anyone can learn to plaster their window wells to look magnificent.

Perhaps the hardest part of the entire process is getting the plaster to stay put. Gravity has a large say in this process and whenever a novice plasterer tries to apply mud to the top of a window well, often called “the lid” in the industry, gravity usually wins. Below are some tips to beat gravity and create your own beautiful window well.

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Financing a Straw Bale Home

Money HousePerhaps the most commonly asked question about straw bale construction is: “How do I finance it?” Unfortunately, the answer hasn’t gotten much easier over the years as straw bale construction is still considered alternative to the mainstream and, as we all know, banks are not big fans of taking risks on alternative construction techniques. That said, there are some things that you can do to improve your efforts and increase your chance of receiving funding.

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Straw Bale Broker Delivers Across the United States

Bales of Straw in the FieldI recently met a bale broker during the New York straw bale workshop. He delivered the bales for our project in Montgomery, and I was very happy with the bale quality. In fact, they were the best bales I have seen all season. I assumed he was a local farmer until he visited the site. That’s when I learned that he is actually a bale broker and that he can arrange for bale deliveries all over the United States. He works with over 120 different farms across the country and many different trucking companies. They not only deliver the bales but stack them on site as well. He is definitely worth the call if you are looking for quality bales.

Here’s his contact information:

Nick Fitzpatrick

845.901.1892 (cell)

800.747.3811 (office)

nick.fitzpatrick@adenbrook.com

www.adenbrook.com

Minimizing Construction Costs

Architectural PlansI recently wrote to a host of one of the 2015 straw bale workshops about how to minimize her construction costs. She is concerned that she will end up with a beautiful design that she cannot afford to actually build. Having heard this concern many times over the years, I thought I would share my response with you all as I believe it is helpful information to have on hand before you start designing. Below are seven things to keep in mind when getting started.

  • Keep roof lines simple. The more intricate the roof design, the more expensive it is to build. Intersections, pitch variations, and other details make construction harder and labor more expensive.
  • Taller is less expensive than wider. If you are looking for square footage, it’s often less expensive to build up than it is to build out. This increases square footage without adding additional materials for the foundation and roof.
  • Consider finish materials. Everything from roofing (metal versus composition shingles, for example) to flooring, plumbing and electrical fixtures, and cabinetry can have a big impact on budget. Find affordable options that still meet your aesthetic requirements.
  • Get a good plan. Saving money by working with a less than qualified designer will cost you money in the end as the construction details won’t be as well laid out. That means more time head scratching for the builder and more mistakes during construction.
  • Simplify the overall design. As with the roof, the wall layout also impacts cost. The more turns, corners, and angles you have in your design, the more expensive it will be to build. Keep in mind that all of those details mean more foundation work, wall framing, baling and plastering details, and roof structure detailing.
  • Know your budget ahead of time. If you share your budget with your designer and builder, then you can discuss how to design/build TO that number rather than design and build with hopes of hitting an unknown. The more up front and honest you are with yourself and your team, the more successful you will be.
  • Have a contingency plan. Regardless of what number and design you settle into, make sure you have a contingency fund in your loan or extra cash set aside (if you are building out of pocket) for the unknowns. There are ALWAYS unknowns and being blindsided by them can ruin your project.

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